Skip to main navigation menu Skip to main content Skip to site footer

##common.pageHeaderLogo.altText##

Announcements

Black Lives Matter

2020-10-19

Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne (SCL/ÉLC) invites interdisciplinary contributions to this expansive cultural archive of abolitionist and anti-racist art, writing, scholarship, and activism. We welcome reflections on the history of art and activism on Turtle Island/Canada and contributions of new art, creative writing, literary-critical scholarship, manifestoes, and other cultural interventions. We particularly welcome contributions that connect the history of abolitionist and anti-racist activism on Turtle Island/Canada with the activism of the present moment. We are also open to reflections on the issue of special issues themselves as we recognize that Black Lives Matter should not have to be a special issue within the history of Canadian cultural institutions in general and literary critical journals in particular.

Other topics include but are not limited to:

  • Anti-Black racism in Canadian arts and cultural organizations
  • Anti-Black racism and public health
  • The intersections between Black Lives Matter and Indigenous decolonial struggles
  • Blackness in (and out of) the Canadian canon
  • The pedagogy of Black Canadian literature, from elementary to tertiary levels and beyond
  • The intersections of Black Pride and 2SLGBTQIA+ communities with BLM
  • The role of publishers and publications, and alternate means of publication
  • Disability, ableism, and making space in Black communities
  • Monumentalization: How do we remember and account for various histories?
  • Acknowledging the elders: ageism and its effects on community
  • Multilingualism: How does language affect BLM activism?
  • The effects of policing and various social agencies, such as child welfare institutions

English submissions of essays of 6000-8000 words, including Notes and Works Cited, should conform to the MLA Handbook, 8th edition; French submissions to Le guide du rédacteur (Translation Bureau, 1996).

We also welcome poetry, artwork, manifestoes, and other cultural interventions of varying lengths of less than 5000 words.

Please submit all work electronically via Word attachment to scl@unb.ca. Deadline for submissions is 31 August 2021. For further details about submissions, visit the journal’s website at https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/SCL or contact: Camille Isaacs, OCAD University, cisaacs@faculty.ocadu.ca, or Karina Vernon, University of Toronto, karina.vernon@utoronto.ca.

 

Read more about Black Lives Matter

Resurfacing: Women Writing in 1970s Canada

2020-03-18

Today’s scholarly community revisits women’s writing in Canada during the long 1970s. Seventeen contributions yield new insights into the cultural works produced by women working in French and English, from the west coast to the east, between the mid-to-late 1960s and the early-to-mid 1980s. Contributors revisit and recontexualize feminist works from this period, demonstrating the extent to which they remain amenable to critical recovery for new generations of readers who approach them from multiple formal, theoretical, critical, cultural, and material perspectives.

Read more about Resurfacing: Women Writing in 1970s Canada

Indigenous Literary Arts of Truth and Redress / Arts littéraires autochtones de vérité et de réparation

2019-08-16

Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne (SCL/ÉLC) invites essays arising from and/or emerging after the fifth annual gathering of the Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA) held on unceded Musqueam (xʷməθkʷəy̓əm) territory at the University of British Columbia in June 2019. We invite contributors to reconsider dominant discourses of reconciliation through explorations of Indigenous literatures as expressions of truth, reformation, reclamation, resurgence, and redress.

Read more about Indigenous Literary Arts of Truth and Redress / Arts littéraires autochtones de vérité et de réparation

Announcing the winner of the 2018 Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature

2019-08-16

The winner of this year's Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature is Cornel Bogle for his essay “The Spatial Politics of Homosociality in Austin Clarke’s In This City” in 43.1 (2018).  The winning essay was selected by a committee of three adjudicators – Danielle Fuller (U Alberta), Guy Beauregard (National Taiwan U), and Lorraine York (McMaster) – from among the essays that appeared in SCL’s two issues published in 2018. The prize has a value of $500.

 

Honourable mention goes to Tania Aguila-Way for “Seed Activism, Global Environmental Justice, and Avant-Garde Aesthetics in Annabel Soutar’s Seeds” in 43.1 (2018).

Read more about Announcing the winner of the 2018 Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature

Announcing the winner of the 2017 Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature

2018-06-11

The winner of this year's Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature is Sarah Wylie Krotz for her essay “The Affective Geography of Wild Rice: A Literary Study” published in the special 19th-Century issue, 42.1 (2017). The winning essay was selected by a committee of three adjudicators — Wendy Roy (Saskatchewan), Jennifer Andrews (UNB), and Faye Hammill (Strathclyde) — from among the essays that appeared in SCL’s two issues published in 2017. The prize has a value of $500.

The prize judges had this to say: 

“The Affective Geography of Wild Rice: A Literary Study” is a remarkable study of how the complex significance of wild rice opens up a rich conversation between “colonial Canadian natural history and Anishnaabe accounts of the plant and its history” to illuminate its role in the past and the present.  By attending to the emotions and bodily sensations of the geography of wild rice as depicted in a variety of literary representations over the past two centuries, Krotz demonstrates how a grain becomes a marker for and representation of an intricate set of interactions that reveal what is lost in translation within the colonial encounter. She also raises critical questions about the singularity of Canadian law by probing the significance of wild rice as a manifestation or embodiment of Anishnaabe law. The result is an article that persuasively and thoughtfully reconfigures how readers may understand the “literary history” of rice and the challenge such a reading poses to the white settler colonial mindset that has so fundamentally shaped English-Canadian literature. 

Honorable mention goes to Chantal Richard for her essay “Discours identitaires véhiculés par les premiers journaux francophones en Acadie (1867-1900): Confédération ou colonisation?” published in 42.1 (2017).

Read more about Announcing the winner of the 2017 Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature