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Announcements

  • Neoliberal Environments / Les environnements néolibéraux

    2019-08-16

    In his 2011 book Anne of Tim Hortons: Globalization and the Reshaping of Atlantic-Canadian Literature, the late Herb Wyile pushed back against neoliberal ideologies through readings of literary texts that, in his view, countered “the mobility, deracination, and sense of placelessness that characterize our highly technological, globalized consumer society.” Following Wyile’s cue, this special issue asks: how do literary and cultural texts counter or conform to neoliberalism? How do they respond to environmental challenges in an age shaped by global capital?

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  • Indigenous Literary Arts of Truth and Redress / Arts littéraires autochtones de vérité et de réparation

    2019-08-16

    Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne (SCL/ÉLC) invites essays arising from and/or emerging after the fifth annual gathering of the Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA) held on unceded Musqueam (xʷməθkʷəy̓əm) territory at the University of British Columbia in June 2019. We invite contributors to reconsider dominant discourses of reconciliation through explorations of Indigenous literatures as expressions of truth, reformation, reclamation, resurgence, and redress.

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  • Announcing the winner of the 2018 Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature

    2019-08-16

    The winner of this year's Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature is Cornel Bogle for his essay “The Spatial Politics of Homosociality in Austin Clarke’s In This City” in 43.1 (2018).  The winning essay was selected by a committee of three adjudicators – Danielle Fuller (U Alberta), Guy Beauregard (National Taiwan U), and Lorraine York (McMaster) – from among the essays that appeared in SCL’s two issues published in 2018. The prize has a value of $500.

     

    Honourable mention goes to Tania Aguila-Way for “Seed Activism, Global Environmental Justice, and Avant-Garde Aesthetics in Annabel Soutar’s Seeds” in 43.1 (2018).

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  • Queer Bodies / Corps queer

    2018-10-24

    Special Issue of Studies in Canadian Literature

    Queer Bodies / Corps queer

    This special issue of SCL on the Queer Body / Corps queer aims to analyze and expose the multiple subjugating effects and normalizing dimensions of embodiment and subjectivity in view of which and against which the queer body is conceived as a territory of exploration, subversion, and liberation. 

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  • Announcing the winner of the 2017 Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature

    2018-06-11

    The winner of this year's Herb Wyile Prize in Canadian Literature is Sarah Wylie Krotz for her essay “The Affective Geography of Wild Rice: A Literary Study” published in the special 19th-Century issue, 42.1 (2017). The winning essay was selected by a committee of three adjudicators — Wendy Roy (Saskatchewan), Jennifer Andrews (UNB), and Faye Hammill (Strathclyde) — from among the essays that appeared in SCL’s two issues published in 2017. The prize has a value of $500.

    The prize judges had this to say: 

    “The Affective Geography of Wild Rice: A Literary Study” is a remarkable study of how the complex significance of wild rice opens up a rich conversation between “colonial Canadian natural history and Anishnaabe accounts of the plant and its history” to illuminate its role in the past and the present.  By attending to the emotions and bodily sensations of the geography of wild rice as depicted in a variety of literary representations over the past two centuries, Krotz demonstrates how a grain becomes a marker for and representation of an intricate set of interactions that reveal what is lost in translation within the colonial encounter. She also raises critical questions about the singularity of Canadian law by probing the significance of wild rice as a manifestation or embodiment of Anishnaabe law. The result is an article that persuasively and thoughtfully reconfigures how readers may understand the “literary history” of rice and the challenge such a reading poses to the white settler colonial mindset that has so fundamentally shaped English-Canadian literature. 

    Honorable mention goes to Chantal Richard for her essay “Discours identitaires véhiculés par les premiers journaux francophones en Acadie (1867-1900): Confédération ou colonisation?” published in 42.1 (2017).

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