Paths of Friction: Intoning Societies, Identity, and Nature in 21st-Century Iceland
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How to Cite

Vlasis, K. (2020). Paths of Friction: Intoning Societies, Identity, and Nature in 21st-Century Iceland. MUSICultures, 46(2), 62 - 84. Retrieved from https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/MC/article/view/30490

Abstract

During the early 20th century, traditional music practitioners in Reykjavík, Iceland gathered together to form the Iðunn Society of Intoners and Versifiers to preserve indigenous music practices such as rímur. Since then, numerous other societies have organized, many within recent years. Drawing from Tim Ingold’s process of “wayfaring,” Anna Tsing’s analysis of “friction” in globalized space, and ethnographic research, I consider how traditional music practices sonically represent the lived experiences of past and present intoners (Ingold 2011; Tsing 2005). I further examine how both music and nature shape cultural identity by using the idea of pathways and path formation.

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