Uncanny Movement through Virtual Spaces: Michael Pisaro’s fields have ears
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How to Cite

Jamieson, D. (2019). Uncanny Movement through Virtual Spaces: Michael Pisaro’s fields have ears. MUSICultures, 45(1-2). Retrieved from https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/MC/article/view/28943

Abstract

Michael Pisaro’s fields have ears is a series of ten pieces that embody an ecological approach to composition. The guiding idea behind the series is that the location of a sound is as (or more) important than its timing, and that how a listener understands a sound is affected by both the listener’s and the sound’s position in space. This paper uses the series as an exemplary example of James Gibson’s ecological thought in composition through its foregrounding of motion and space, and its creation of uncanny virtual worlds combining musical sounds, noise, and field recordings. It also explores the idea that Gibsonian perception has significant affinities with Kyoto School aesthetics, and analyzes Pisaro’s music utilizing methodologies from both disciplines.
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