Notes and Comments / Nouvelles brèves - Notes and Comments / Nouvelles brèves

Notes and Comments / Nouvelles brèves

Notes and Comments / Nouvelles brèves

97 NOTES AND COMMENTS - NOUVELLES BREVES "SPECIMENS OF CHINA BROUGHT TO THE COLONIES" AND "HOUSEHOLD WARES OF COLONIAL TIMES": THE WELDON AND TRUMBALL-PRIME COLLECTIONS by Marie Elwood The Weldon Collection The Museum of King's College, Windsor, Nova Scotia, received "an interesting and valuable donation in 1880, in the collection of Loyalist china, presented by Judge and Mrs. Weldon of Fredericton on the 97th anniversary of the landing of the Loyalists in New Brunswick." 1 This collection still survives and is probably the earliest collection of ceramics in Canada. It was formed ca. 1865-75 by Mrs. Susannah Lucy Anne Weldon who presented, along with the 363 pieces of pottery and porcelain, her hand-written catalogue of the collection which she called "Specimens of China brought to the Colonies by the Early Settlers, particularly the 2Loyalists." In the preface she stated that "the original intention of the collection was to save from destruction some specimens of the China brought to the country by the Loyalists - and to place this collection in King's College, the first College in British North America." (The college was founded in 1789.) Mrs. Weldon's interest was particularly directed towards finding china that belonged to Loyalist families. In her preface she wrote: It is rather a remarkable fact that in the hazardous departure of these Refugees, though obliged in many cases to leave their books, plate and even clothing: still the bowl in which their children were baptized or some valuable articles of glass or porcelain was always saved and it is believed their descendants will place some value on these slight memorials of an ancestry worthy to be held in all honour. 98 The inference throughout the catalogue notes is that Mrs. Weldon formed her collection by asking families of early settlers or Loyalist background for old pieces of family china. Presumably it took a number of years to collect the more than 300 pieces hence the suggested collecting period of ca. 1865-75. The terms "given by" and "presented by" recur throughout the text of the catalogue and 133 Loyalists families are named as sources. The condition of the pieces varies, as might be expected in a collection thus acquired by donation. Mrs. Weldon was interested in provenance, not in ceramic identification. She recorded the fragile history of ownership and her notes are a curious blend of genealogy and family history, sometimes discursive, though the comments on the ceramics are brief, for example, "an oval dish," "a rare and remarkable vase." Occasionally a factory is named -Worcester, Wedgwood, Chelsea; some entries record only "Old Dish. Loyalist." Mrs. Weldon stated in her notes that "it is hoped that it will be borne in mind that it [the collection] must be valued not for its intrinsic worth, but as recollections of the early settlers in these colonies among which will be found several contributions from families of later arrival." The collection is emblematic of Mrs. Weldon's idea of Loyalists as people of wealth and "self-denying devotion in their attachment to their Sovereign that exceeded anything on record in the pages of History." The social categories from which she has drawn her collection are largely military and civilian officials - lawyers, clerics, schoolmasters - but in one entry she records "Old Saucer, Loyalist, evidently of 'very low degree'," recognizing that all Loyalists did not fit a pattern of gentility. Mrs. Weldon came from an established Nova Scotia family of lawyers; she was the daughter of Thomas Chandler Haliburton, judge and author, whose ancestor Andrew Haliburton came from Edinburgh to Boston in 1717. Susannah Lucy Anne Haliburton was born in 1817 in Windsor, Nova Scotia, and married the Hon. John Wesley Weldon, judge of the Supreme Court and Speaker of the House of Representatives, New Brunswick. Their son, Haliburton 3Weldon, described as "a young barrister of great promise," died in 1873 shortly after his graduation from King's College and it was as a memorial to him that his mother placed the Loyalist collection of china in King's College. 99 Mrs. Weldon collected in New Brunswick and in Nova Scotia. Thus, the collection is of considerable regional significance since it provides material evidence of wares brought to the Maritimes and considered by their owners as "old china" when the collection was assembled over 100 years ago. At the time there was no great interest in china collecting. In his 1878 reference work on ceramics for American readers, William Cowper Prime wrote that ten years ago there were probably not ten collectors of Pottery and Porcelain in the United States. Today there are perhaps ten thousand. The exhibition in public museums of the fine works of ceramic art by the few collectors who possessed them revealed for the first time to the American public the wealth of beauty that is in old china.4Mrs. Weldon's collecting activities belong to a period when there were few collectors. Our sources of information on ceramic wares' brought to this country by early settlers and Loyalists depend on archaeological evidence, newspaper advertisements, merchant's account books, and inventories of estates rather than on documented examples. The Weldon collection extends this information. At the end of her catalogue Mrs. Weldon wrote that "the Three Cabinets contain 363 Pieces - The History of a People Told in China" - her documented examples. The collection may be summarized as containing mainly English tablewares of the period ca. 1760 to 1840 and Chinese export porcelain ranging from ca. 1610 to 1790. The examples illustrated on pages 102-6 have been selected as representative of the collection. Mrs. Weldon's notes on provenance are included in the captions to convey the character of her catalogue. The Trumbull - P rime Collection In the United States there is a collection of ceramics which, like the Weldon Collection, was presented to a university in the 1880s. This is the Trumbull-Prime collection given to Princeton University in 1889. The donor was William Cowper Prime (1825-1905) who graduated from Princeton in 1843 and who had a career as a schoolmaster, lawyer, and editor. In 1874 he became the first vice-president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 100 He and his wife, Mary Trumbull, had formed a considerable collection of pottery and porcelain and in 1878 he published Pottery and Porcelain of All Times and Nations which is illustrated with examples from the collection. In the preface he wrote that I have been compelled to rely on... my own imperfect collection, which is occasionally referred to as the Trumbull-Prime Collection which name it bears in memory of its founder, who was, as far as I know, the first lady and perhaps the first person in America who made a special study of ceramic art.5This collection was offered to Princeton University on condition that an appropriate building be provided to house it. Prime also proposed to the trustees that they create a professorship in the new discipline of the history of art. This was done and Prime was appointed the first professor of art history at Princeton. He provided a catalogue, written on cards, filed by factory name, in three black-japanned boxes now in the vault of the Art Museum. There were about 1,000 pieces when the collection was received in 1889 and there are now about 800 pieces, in the following categories: Ancient, Far Eastern, European, and American. English wares are dominant in the collection. Prime was interested in identification; his notes on provenance are occasional and brief but they do provide evidence that English and Chinese export porcelain wares in the collection were obtained in New England. Prime found "Lowestoft porcelain" (i.e., Chinese export porcelain) "more plentiful here than any other kind of porcelain." As in Mrs. Weldon's collection there are extended notes on ownership on some pieces, as shown in the following examples. A note pasted on the bottom of a coffee pot (no. 29-394) states that "this set of china was made to the order of our Mother, Mrs. Elizabeth H. Smith (of Philadelphia) at Canton, China, in the year 1809." The coffee pot has sloping sides, ribbed, interlaced handle, straight spout, and shallow domed cover with pineapple knob; a band of grapes in gold and red encircle the rim and the initials "E.S." appear on each side. A hot-water pitcher (no. 29-381) with pear-shaped body, scrolled loop handle, and convex lid painted with famille rose motifs bears a label, "A Relic of the Revolutionary War of 1776." 101 Perhaps most interesting to compare, in the context of the Weldon collection, is a Staffordshire salt-glaze dish - an eight-lobed plate with basket-work relief decoration. On the base of the plate is a paper label: This plate belonged to my Grandfather, Captain William Smith and was in his house and home on Second Street next door to Friends' Meeting-House in Phila [delphia] when the British entered it, breaking, burning and destroying almost everything in it. He being at this time in the army. This being one of the few articles that was not destroyed has come to Julia T. Smith...This account is from my Grandmother, Elizabeth Smith. Thus, the Trumbull-Prime collection contains survival specimens of pottery and porcelain in use in New England ca. 1780 and retained in family ownership. Another collector in New England was Annie (Trumbull) Slosson whose book The China Hunter's Club recorded the collecting activities of a group in New England. It also contains a listing of the pieces found in searches through villages and farm houses, which she summarized by stating that "we thus proved that New England could...furnish very fair illustrative collection of the ceramic art in Old England."6In 1892 Alice Morse Earle wrote that there is but one public collection in America which I have seen that is of positive and unfailing worth to the American china collector - the Trumbull-Prime Collection. I mean for the...gatherer of household wares of Colonial times and of the early part of this century.' The Weldon Collection and the Trumbull-Prime Collection survive as interesting examples of such ceramic collections.7Illustrations All illustrations are from the Weldon Collection owned by the University of King's College, Halifax, Nova Scotia. The collection is housed in the Library. The photographs, taken by Kerry Delorey, are courtesy of the University of King's College. 102 Fig. 1. Porcelain coffee cup (height 6.5 cm), attributed to Longton Hall ca. 1760. White with narrow gilt borders at rim and foot. The handle has a small lobed terminal and is painted with a gilt bell-flower. This cup belonged to Sir Guy Carleton (1724-1808) who, as commander-in-chief in America, supervised the evacuation of the Loyalists from New York in 1783. Cat. no. W.65. Fig. 2. Tea caddy (height 11.2 cm), Chinese export porcelain, painted in famille rose enamels, ca. 1760. This survived in the family of Joshua Temple de St. Croix, a wealthy New York merchant who sailed for Nova Scotia in 1783 in one of his own vessels and settled in the Annapolis Valley on 1,500 acres known as Mount Pleasant. Mrs. Weldon's catalogue note refers to this tea caddy being used by the St. Croix family when the Duke of Kent visited Mount Pleasant en route to Annapolis Royal.Cat. no. W.24. This ovoid tea caddy with its modelled scrolled foot is one of the variant shapes of tea caddy. Later, ca. 1770, a rectangular arched tea caddy form became popular; an example of this type from the MacKay family of Windsor, N.S., is also in the Weldon collection. 103 Fig. 3. Milk jug (height 13 cm), spoon tray (length 13 cm), and tea caddy (height 12.5 cm), ca. 1775. These pieces, also owned by the St. Croix family, are part of a Chinese export porcelain tea service painted in enamel colours and showing two figures - a woman leaning against a tree watching a boy who holds a bird - within a fenced garden. These are in the style and palette known as "Mandarin" which developed ca. 1775 and which show, usually, Chinese scenes from ordinary life with figures in a garden or terrace setting against a background of landscape and buildings. The colours used are characteristically iron-red, green, and crimson-purple, with some underglaze blue or gold. The milk-jug, spoon tray, and tea caddy are listed by Mrs. Weldon as "China for many years in the St. Croix family when the Duke of Kent was in Halifax." Cat. no. W.30a-e. Fig. 4. Base and cover (length 26.5 cm) of a Worcester procelain dish of a type referred to as a roast chestnut basket, ca. 1768-76. Only the oval stand and low-domed lid, with pierced openwork trellis pattern, survive of a "Dessert dish, part of a set owned by Colonel Gibbons the rest lost in a fire. Colonel Gibbons was Inspecting Field Officer, Fredericton." Cat. no. W.153. 104 Fig. 5. Scallop-shell dish (length 19.2 cm), Chinese export porcelain in the "Chinese Imari" style, ca. 1705-20. This flanged bowl in the form of a scallop shell has moulded ribbing and is painted in underglaze blue, red enamel, and gilt with a central floret surrounded by peony and chrysanthemum within a "cash" border containing half chrysanthemums. This dish belonged to Dr. Woodford of the Rifle Brigade, Fredericton, N.B. Cat. no. W.130. Fig. 7. Tureen (height 21.5 cm) and leaf-shaped tray (length 28.5 cm), two serving dishes of Chinese export porcelain, painted in underglaze blue in the pattern known as "Canton," ca. 1790. The tureen has a deeply splayed foot, chamfered sides, and boar's head handles. The leaf-shaped tray is a stand for a sauce boat. This is part of a dinner service which "belonged to Colonel Tonge who came from the West Indies and was a member of the House of Assembly in Nova Scotia in 1761. Settled at Winkworth, Windsor, Nova Scotia. The last descendant of this noble family died in 1876, from whom this plate was obtained." Cat. nos. W.80, W.81. Fig. 6. Sauce boat (height 11.2 cm), Chinese export porcelain painted in famille rose enamels, ca. 1770. This dish is rib-moulded with a scalloped rim, the interior painted with flowers and rock-work, the exterior with an arrowhead border in iron-red and gilt and flower sprigs. This was presented by Senator Botsford to Mrs. Weldon. It had belonged to his grandfather, Amos Botsford of Newtown, Connecticut, who came as a Loyalist to New Brunswick in 1784. He became Speaker of the House of Assembly in 1792 and died at Saint John, the senior barrister in the Colony, in 1812.Cat. no. W.88. 105 Fig. 8. Worcester porcelain teapot (height 13 cm), ca. 1760, with vertical ribbed sides and decorated with underglaze blue border designs. Marked. "Brought from England by the Weldon family in 1760." John Weldon of Crathorne, Yorkshire, born in 1732, married Ann Dale at Middleham, Yorkshire, on 20 May 1762.8 This small teapot may have been a wedding gift to Ann Weldon. The Weldons settled at Dorchester, New Brunswick.Cat. no. W.22. Fig. 9. "St. George and the Dragon" (height 20 cm), earthenware group, ca. 1790-1818. This equestrian figure with rearing horse and dragon stands on a mound base covered with leaves and flowers. It is painted in enamel colours - iron-red, yellow, black, and green; St. George's plumed helmet and oval shield are painted with silver lustre. The group bears an impressed mark "Wood and Caldwell," the successors of the firm of Enoch Wood of Burslem.Cat. no. W.125. This Staffordshire figure belonged to Captain Bailey of the Loyal American Regiment who came to Fredericton in 1783. "He died at the advanced age of 97," Mrs. Weldon records; his daughter, "an old Lady who took a great interest in this collection," presented this figure saying that "her father highly prized this St. George and thought every English gentlemen should have one." To this Mrs. Weldon added a note about the donor: "Miss Bailey died at Fredericton in 1875. She remembered when the Tea was thrown overboard in Boston, being then about seven years old, which would make her age about 105." 106 Fig. 10. Dry-body wine cooler (height 29 cm), moulded design of grapes and vine leaves and handles in the form of satyrs' heads. Made by W. Davenport and Company ca. 1798, marked. This wine cooler belonged to the Hon.Charles Ramage Prescott, a prosperous merchant of Halifax, Nova Scotia. He retired from business in 1810 and established a house and horticultural property at Starr's Point where he cultivated fruit orchards. He was a sociable man who entertained well. (Prescott House is now owned by the Nova Scotia Museum.) Fig. 11. Mustard pot (height 8.8 cm), Wedgwood creamware, ca. 1817. This pot, representative of the more modest dishes in the Weldon collection, has a cup-shaped bowl on a neatly turned foot. It is banded with a scallop border in blue-green enamel. This was "in the Hazen family, Loyal-ists, given to Mrs. Bowyer Smith, Saint John, New Brunswick. " Cat. no. W.222. Fig. 12. Oval twig-basket (length 24 cm), also known as a cress basket, creamware, ca. 1800. These dishes were made by several factories, including Wedgwood and Leeds, and were also copied in Chinese export porcelain. Usually the dish has a separate stand with a moulded wickerwork decoration and pierced rim. This example was owned by Mrs. Weldon's family, the Haliburtons. William Haliburton, a lawyer, came from Boston to Nova Scotia in 1761. His son, William Hersey Otis Haliburton, also a lawyer, was the father of Thomas Chandler Haliburton. Cat. no. WA4. 107 NOTES 1. King's College Record 27, no. 232 (February 1906), p. 62, University of King's College Library, Halifax, N.S. 2. The Weldon collection and catalogues can be seen in the library of the University of King's College, Halifax, N.S. 3. King's College Record, p. 62. A. William Cowper Prime, Pottery and Porcelain of All Times and Nations (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1878). 5. Ibid., p. 7. 6. [Annie (Trumbull) Slossen], The China Hunter's Club (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1878), p. 102. 7. Alice Morse Earle, China Collecting in America (1892; reprint éd., Rutland, Vt.: Charles Tuttle, 1973), p. 413. 8. W.S. Weldon, The Family of Weldon in Canada 1732-1952 (Amherst, N.S.: n.p., 1953), pp. viii, ix. HISTORICAL PLANNING AND RESEARCH BRANCH, ONTARIO MINISTRY OF CULTURE AND RECREATION by David Skene-Melvin If man had a hand in shaping Ontario's environment, the Historical Planning and Research Branch has a hand in the decision-making process as to how the heritage patterns and resources of that environment are to be conserved. The branch comprises the archaeological and heritage planning expertise within the Ontario government and its activities encompass research, planning, community presence, and statutory administration. Firstly, it works directly with planning and development ministries and both public and private agencies to incorporate heritage conservation 108 concerns into their programmes. It provides advice about heritage planning as well as strategies for the conservation of Ontario's heritage resources. It participates in the planning processes of land-disturbing agencies at early stages, identifies areas of conflict and areas for further investigation, and evaluates the heritage resource base. Its purpose is to maximize the conservation of heritage resources at minimum cost and with minimum disruption to its clients' objectives. It aims to stimulate public awareness and appreciation of heritage resources and to stimulate initiatives toward conservation and wise use by means of information programmes and by encouraging community participation in planning. Secondly, the branch administers the Provincial legislation concerning archaeological resources. Under The Ontario Heritage Act, 1974, all archaeological work in the province must be licensed. To fulfill this mandate the branch has four sections: Archaeological Planning, Archaeological Research, Heritage Planning, and the Administrative Unit, which includes the Publications Programme. The work of the Archaeological Planning Section originates in provisions of The Ontario Heritage Act, 1974. Part VI of the act, entitled "Conservation of Resources of Archaeological Value," has resulted in legal mechanisms for which the section is responsible, including archaeological licences and permits, designations of property of archaeological or historical significance, stop work orders to protect sites from destruction by development, and trusts governing deposits of archaeological artifacts in public institutions. Further information on these is contained in the Statute and the Regulations, ongoing policy statements, and the booklet Archaeological Conservation in Ontario. The section also provides staff support to the Archaeological Programme of the Ontario Heritage Foundation (parts II and VI, Ontario Heritage Act, 1974) in basic administration, monitoring of archaeological expenditures, policy and programme development and implementation, and, in conjunction with the Archaeological Research Section, studies of Foundation properties of archaeological value. Further, it maintains and continually updates a computerized archaeological sites data base for Ontario. The known sites 109 are recorded in a system comprising site reports, maps, photographs, and site record forms and this information is available in varying degrees of detail to planners, researchers, conservationists, and the interested public. Work is underway to develop an historical and architectural features data system to complement the archaeological one. The work of the Archaeological Research Section is centred in its six regional field offices (see appended list), the community-oriented, operational arm of the ministry's archaeological programme. This programme stimulates public awareness and concern through a regional network of contacts and volunteer workers. The regional archaeologists assist with licensing and granting activities under The Ontario Heritage Act, examine private artifact collections, provide on-job training for students in archaeological techniques, and recruit volunteers to locate and record archaeological sites. They also carry on original research, resource rescue, and site inventory, und ertake field surveys, excavations, and technical analyses of artifacts, and advise other government ministries and community groups. A large proportion of their time is spent in emergency rescue and salvage archaeology. Municipalities and private citizens can obtain information, advice, technical assistance, and archaeological conservation services from the regional offices. Information is also.made available through publications and displays on archaeological research. The Heritage Planning Section, based in Toronto, has two major areas of responsibility. It co-ordinates the branch's work in reviewing government and private plans and proposed policies, as well as draft legislation and regulations, to ensure attention to heritage conservation. It advises local and provincial authorities on matters affecting planning for the conservation of historic landscapes and structures. These responsibilities include preparing comments and position statements on a range of planning activities: - environmental assessment documents required under The Environmental Assessment Act, 1975; - applications for development permits under The Niagara Escarpment Planning and Development Act, 1973; - official plans prepared by municipalities under The Planning Act; 110 - the heritage component of parks and outdoor recreation systems plans prepared by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Parks Canada; - opportunities for heritage conservation and tourism to work together in planning for public and private tourism development. The review of proposed policy, as well as draft legislation and regulations, has included comment on The Ontario Provincial Parks Planning and Management Policies (1979), the White Paper on the Planning Act (1979) , and the Proposed Plan for the Niagara Escarpment (1980). The Heritage Planning section often participates in public hearings regarding planning for the conservation of distinctive man-made landscapes, fine buildings, and archaeological resources. It also prepares publications on a wide variety of heritage conservation planning problems and issues. These involve research and the identification and evaluation of historic landscapes and structures through fieldwork; examples of these studies will be found in the appended list of publications. Finally, the section advises on specific problems in heritage conservation planning, for example: - advice to a municipal planning department; - guidance to a Conservation Authority in planning for the protection, restoration, or enhancement of heritage properties as part of a flood control project; - recommendations to the Ministry of Government Services on the heritage significance as well as the appropriate disposition and conservation treatment of a fine old building owned by the province; - planning assistance to a local society interested in promoting or undertaking the conservation and interpretation of the community's historic built environment; - recommendations to a developer interested in planning to conserve cultural properties while pursuing a project involving a change in land-use or land-disturbance activities. The three sections - Archaeological Planning, Archaeological Research, and Heritage Planning - work together in the development of the provincial policy for the conservation of both archaeological and built heritage. This ranges from assistance on ad hoc issues with long-range implications (for example, the branch's role in the question of unmarked cemeteries) to participation in a continuing programme (for example, the review of and comment on Environmental Assessments). The branch's Publications Programme produces two major series of monographs (Archaeo-logical Research Report and Heritage Planning Study) as well as various booklets, brochures, and flyers for public information, and technical reports and planning documents. A list of published works is appended. Regional Archaeological Offices Regional Archaeologists of the Historical Planning and Research Branch, Ministry of Culture and Recreation, can be contacted at regional field offices as indicated: Northwestern Ontario 207 First Street South (P.O. Box 2880) Kenora, Ontario P7A 7P4 Telephone: (807) 468-8928 Northeastern Ontario Elgin Tower, 3rd Floor, 390 Bay Street Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 2A7 Telephone: (705) 253-2625 South Central Ontario - Huronia 700 Bay Street, 8th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z6 Telephone: (416) 965-8258 North Central Ontario 1825 East Arthur Street Thunder Bay "F", Ontario P7E 5N7 Telephone: (807) 475-1447 Southwestern Ontario - Bruce Peninsula "Chestnut Hill" 55 Centre Street London, Ontario N6J 1T4 Telephone: (519) 433-8401 Eastern Ontario - Ottawa Valley -Algonquin 11th Floor, Suite 1105 1 Nicholas Street Ottawa, Ontario KIN 7B7 Telephone: (613) 566-3731 112 Publications Please note that all orders must be sent to: Publications Service, Ministry of Government Services, 5th Floor, 880 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M7A 1N8, accompanied by payment. Archaeological conservation in Ontario; a general information book for the public. 1979. 22p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-4503-9 50c The archaeology of North Central Ontario; prehistoric cultures north of Superior. 2d (rev.) ed. 1979. 12p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-4258-7 25c Guidelines on the man-made heritage component of environmental assessments. 1980. ISBN 0-7743-4832-1 (forthcoming) I Archaeological Research Report Series 1. MacLeod, Donald G. Annual review; archaeology 72-73. 1973. Out-of-print 2. Tyyska, Allen Edwin, and Burnes, James A. Archaeology from North Bay to Mattawa. 1973. Out-of-print 3. Weiler, John. Michipicoten; Hudson's Bay Company post 1821-1904. 1973. Out-of-print (Reprinted in Report no. 14, Three heritage studies.) 4. Konrad, Victor A., Ross, William A., and Bowman, Irene. North Pickering archaeology. 1974. Out-of-print (Reprinted in Report no. 14, Three heritage studies.) 5. Annual review; research 1973-74. 1975. Out-of-print 6. Papers contributed to the Canadian Archaeological Association annual meeting, March 1975. 130 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-1008-1 $2.00 7. Ramsden, Peter. Rocky Ridge; a stratified Archaic site near Inverhuron, Ontario. 1975. 47 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-0993-8 $1.50 8. Baldwin, Doug. The fur-trade in the Moose-Missinaibi River Valley 1770-1917. 1975. Out-of-print (Reprinted in Report no. 16, Spirits of the Pictured Waters.) 113 9. O'Brien, Roberta M. An archaeological survey of Methodist Point Park Reserve. 1976. unpag., illus. ISBN 0-7743-1004-9 $1.50 10. Reid, C.S. "Paddy". Mansion in the wilderness; the archaeology of the Ermatinger House. 1977. 114 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-1085-5 $2.00 11. Smith, Sheryl Ann. The Methodist Point Site; a Middle Ontario Iroquois camp on Georgian Bay. 1979. 85 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-3171-2 3.00 12. Reid, C.S. "Paddy," ed. Northern Ontario fur-trade archaeology; recent research. 1980. ISBN 0-7743-4244-7(Price not yet set.) 13. Skeine-Melvin, David, ed. Collected archaeological papers. 1980. 181 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-4022-3 (Price not yet set.) 14. Skene-Melvin, David, ed. Three heritage studies; on the history of the HBC Michipicoten post and on the archaeology of the North Pickering area. 1980. 139 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-4464-4 $4.00 15. Reid, C.S., ed. Studies in West Patricia archaeology; no. 1: 1978-1979. 1980. 255 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-4707-4(Price not yet set.) 16. Spirits of the Pictured Waters; the archaeology and history of the Missinaibi River valley: Pt. I - The fur trade in the Moose-Missinaibi River valley 1770-1917 by Doug Baldwin: Pt. II -The archaeology of the Missinaibi River valley by David W. Arthurs. Edited by David Skene-Melvin. 1980 (forthcoming) II Heritage Planning Study series 1. Greenwald, Michelle et al. The Welland Canals; historical resources analysis and preservation alternatives. 2d (rev.) ed. 1977, 1979. 175 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-3238-7 $5.00 2. Bucovetsky, Joseph, and Greenwald, Michelle. Townsend traces; heritage conservation in Townsend New Town. 1977. 264 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-2888-6 $4.00 3. Miller, Marilyn G. Straight lines in curved space; colonization roads in Eastern Ontario. 1978. Out-of-print 4. Fram, Mark. Ontario Hydro, Ontario heritage; a study of strategies for the conservation of the heritage of Ontario Hydro. 1980. 154 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-4094-0 (Price not yet set.) 114 5. Skene-Melvin, David, ed. Three Heritage studies; on the history of the HBC Michipicoten post and on the archaeology of the North Pickering area. 1980. 139 p., illus. ISBN 0-7743-4464-4 $4.00 6. Weiler, John ed. Continuity with change; planning for the conservation of Ontario's man-made heritage. 1980 (forthcoming) 7. Heritage studies on the Rideau-Quinte-Trent-Severn Waterway. 1980 (forthcoming) 8. Skene-Melvin, David, ed. Spirits of the Pictured Waters; the archaeology and history of the Missinaibi River valley: Pt. I -The fur trade in the Moose-Missinaibi River valley 1770-1917 by Doug Baldwin; Pt. II - The archaeology of the Missinaibi River valley by David W. Arthurs. 1980 (forthcoming) 9. Cuming, David. A heritage study of provincial road bridges. 1980 (forthcoming) Staff Director: R.B. Apted Editor: D. Skene-Melvin Finance and Administrative Supervisor: Mrs. C.A. Goldsworthy Supervisor, Archaeological Planning: A.E. Tyyska Archaeological Planner: P.J. Carruthers Data Co-ordinator: Ms.S. Merrin Supervisor, Archaeological Research: D.G. MacLeod Northwestern Regional Archaeologist: C.S. Reid Field Archaeologist: Ms.M.G. Rajnovich North Central Regional Archaeologist: W.A. Ross Field Archaeologist: D.W. Arthurs Northeastern Regional Archaeologist: T.A. Conway Field Archaeologist: N.R. Adams South Central Regional Archaeologist: Ms.R.M. O'Brien Southwestern Regional Archaeologist: W.A. Fox Field Archaeologist: I.T. Kenyon Eastern Regional Archaeologist: P.J. Wright Field Archaeologist: P. Englebert Supervisor, Heritage Planning: J.M. Weiler Senior Planner: Ms.M. Greenwald Heritage Planners: D. Cumming; M. Fram; Ms.M. Miller; Ms.J. Simonton Planning Technician: Ms.J. Marion 115 LES PUBLICATIONS DE LA DIRECTION GENERALE DU PATRIMOINE, MINISTÈRE DES AFFAIRES CULTURELLES, QUEBEC par Corneliu Kirjan Dans le but d'offrir au public une image concrète du travail réalisé pour l'étude, la protection et la mise en valeur du patrimoine québécois, la Direction générale du patrimoine du ministère des Affaires culturelles du Québec débuta en 1975 l'édition de deux séries de publications: les "Dossiers" et "Les Cahiers du Patrimoine." Les deux séries de publications s'adressent aussi bien au grand public qu'aux spécialistes et reflètent tous les domaines d'activité de la Direction générale du patrimoine: archéologie, histoire, ethnologie, architecture ancienne, histoire de l'art. Il faut remarquer au début qu'il ne s'agit pas de publications réalisées exclusivement par des chercheurs de la Direction générale du patrimoine et que plusieurs de ces publications représentent le résultat du travail fait par des chercheurs de l'extérieur. Entre les deux séries de publications, il existe des différences que nous essayerons d'expliquer brièvement. Dans la série "Dossiers," on a publié spécialement des ouvrages appelés à devenir des instruments de recherche pour un public avisé: spécialistes, étudiants, etc. On peut mentionner dans cette catégorie les diverses bibliographies, les inventaires archéologiques, architecturaux ou ethnologiques, les catalogues, les dictionnaires, etc. (voir la liste complète en annexe). Plusieurs titres concernent des études ponctuelles consacrées à l'archéologie, à l'ethnologie ou à l'histoire de l'art. Le tirage de ces publications est limité de 500 à 1000 exemplaires et elles sont envoyées gratuitement aux bibliothèques publiques, aux universités et aux collèges, ainsi qu'aux individus et aux organismes qui en font la demande. La série "Cahiers du Patrimoine" présente des études finalisées ou des études d'ensembles (Neuville - Architecture traditionelle. Préhistoire de la région de Moisie). D'autres études concernent un site spécifique 116 "Cahiers du Patrimoine" s'adresse à la fois aux spécialistes et au grand public et est en vente dans les librairies et chez l'Editeur officiel. Face au succès connu par ces deux séries de publications (plusieurs titres furent vite épuisés), la Direction générale du patrimoine décida en 1977 de lancer une nouvelle série adressée spécifiquement au.grand public. Intitulée "Les Retrouvailles," cette série est constituée des mini-monographies consacrées spécialement au patrimoine bâti. Chaque brochure présente l'historique du bâtiment, son évolution architecturale ainsi que les oeuvres d'art les plus importantes qui s'y trouvent. Les publications s'avèrent à la fois une source de renseignements et un guide pour celui qui veut visiter le site. Les trois séries de publications constituent une forme de mise en valeur du patrimoine québécois et représentent un reflet des activités de la Direction générale du patrimoine. I. Les "Dossiers" Les "Dossiers" sont distribués gratuitement par le Centre de documentation de la Direction générale du patrimoine, 6, rue de l'Université, Québec (Québec), GIR 5A6. 1. "Bibliographie pour la conservation et la restauration de lieux et de bâtiments historiques." 2. "Mandeville - site archéologique préhistorique." 3. "Anticosti - esquisse d'aménagement du village de Port-Menier." 4. "Eglise de Sainte-Rose - inventaire architectural." 5. "Le domaine des Soeurs Grises, Montréal." 6. "Liste des monuments historiques du Québec, 1975." 7. "Trésor de l'Eglise Sainte-Luce, comté de Rimouski." 8. "Pabos - site archéologique historique." 9. "Anticosti - le four à chaux de la Baie Sainte-Claire." 10. "La maison André B. Papineau, ville de Laval." 117 "Pointe-aux-Buissons - site archéologique préhistorique." "Inventaire des sites préhistoriques du Québec 1974." "Inuit du Nouveau-Québec - bibliographie." "Le forgeron Emile Asselin, St-François, Ile d'Orléans." "Inventaire des sites préhistoriques du Québec, 1975." "Archives du diocèse de Saint-Jean-de-Québec." "Répertoire des rues de Montréal au XIXe siècle." "Matériel ostéologique - Cap-Chat (DgDq-1)." "Chalouperie Godbout, boutique et instrumentation, Saint-Laurent, île d'Orléans." "Liste des monuments et sites historiques du Québec, 1976." "Montagnais-Naskapi - bibliographie." "Baie James - archéologie - bilan 1972-1976." "Inventaire des sites préhistoriques du Québec, 1976." "Hôtel-Dieu de Québec - catalogue des peintures." "Inventaire des bâtiments du Vieux Montréal." "Les maisons Guéroult et Vanfelson à Québec." "La maison Dupont-Renaud à Québec." "Monuments et sites historiques du Québec, 1977." "Lexique Montagnais-Français." "Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean - bibliographie." "Activités archéologiques, 1976." "Archéologie du lac des Commissaires." "Votre maison...son histoire." "Découvrons St-Jean - ville historique." "Inventaire des sites préhistoriques du Québec, 1977." 118 36. "Répertoire des moulins à eau du Québec." 37. "Répertoire des artisans-potiers québécois - 1655-1916." 38. "Monuments et sites historiques du Québec, 1978." 39. "Inuktituorutit - grammaire purement esquimaude." 40. "Les dépendances agricoles à l'Ile d'Orléans." 41. "Saint-Rémi-de-Napierville - les croix en fer forgé du cimetière." 42. "Bibliographie annotée sur le caribou." 43. "Dictionnaire des infixes de la langue esquimaude." 44. "Repentigny - répertoire des immeubles traditionnels." II. "Les Cahiers du Patrimoine" On peut acheter ces volumes dans les librairies de l'Editeur officiel du Québec ou en envoyant la somme nécessaire sous forme de chèque ou mandat-poste à l'ordre de l'Editeur officiel du Québec, 1283, boul. Charest ouest, Québec (Québec), GIN 2C9. 1. Georges Barré, Cap-Chat (Dg-Dq 1): Un site du sylvicole moyen en Gaspésie. $4.00 2. Laurent Girouard, Station 2: Point-aux-buissons. $4.00 3. [Yves Laframboise], Neuville - Architecture traditionnelle. $4.00 4. Yves Laframboise et al., Calixa-Lavallée: Répertoire d'architecture traditionnelle. [Réimpression] 5. Daniel Chevrier, Préhistoire de la région de Moisie. $5.00 6. Fernand Caron, Fred C. Wurtele, photographe. $4.00 7. André Bernier, Le vieux Sillery. $4.00 8. Michel Dufresne, Beauport, de la côte à l'arrière-pays, ses paysages et ses traditions. $3.50 9. Michel Gaumond et Paul-Louis Martin, Les maîtres-potiers du bourg Saint-Denis, 1785-1888. $4.00 10. Marie-Thérèse Thibault, Monuments et sites historiques du Québec. $5.75 11. Bernard Saladin d'Anglure, La parole changée en pierre. $6.00 119 12. Bernard Genest et al., Les artisans traditionnels de l'est du Québec. $8.00 13. Pierre Bureau, Renée Côté et Claude Michaud, Boucherville: Répertoire d'architecture traditionnelle. $7.00 III. "Les Retrouvailles" On peut acheter ces volumes dans les librairies de l'Editeur officiel du Québec ou en envoyant la somme nécessaire sous forme de chèque ou mandat-poste à l'ordre de l'Editeur officiel du Québec, 1283, boul. Charest ouest, Québec (Québec), GIN 2C9. 1. Les églises et les trésors de Berthierville. $0.75 2. La prison des Plaines d'Abraham. $0.75 3. L'église et l'enclos paroissial de Saint-Mathias de Rouville. $0.75 4. Les églises et le trésor de Saint-Pierre de la Riviëre-du-Sud. $0.75 5. Les monuments historiques de Laterrière. $0.75. 6. La Maison André B. Papineau: Ville Laval. $0.75 7. La plaine côtière de Bellechasse: Guide d'introduction à son patrimoine passé et présent. $0.75 8. Le phare de Pointe-des Monts. $0.75 9. La chapelle des Cuthbert, Berthierville. $0.75 "MARKETING CERAMICS IN NORTH AMERICA" A conference sponsored by the Winterthur Museum and Gardens and the Hagley Museum on the marketing of ceramics in North America from the 1770s to the 1840s was held at Winterthur Museum, Winterthur, Delaware, on 5 April 1980. This conference dealt with ceramics in terms of consumption rather than production and chronology. Identification, chronology, and technology have 120 long been the dominant themes in ceramic research through the study of artifacts, potter's records, probate inventories, and archaeological collections. Papers at this conference used merchants' records to gain an insight into the marketing and distribution of ceramics. Research for these presentations was based on a variety of documentation: a general merchant importer, records of three company factors, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century china merchant importers, a nineteenth-century china jobber's records, and the records of a nineteenth-century potter. Geographically, the records ranged from Quebec to southern Maryland. The papers presented were as follows: 1. George L. Miller, "Goals and Objectives of the Conference" 2. Elizabeth Collard, "George Pozer and the China Market in Quebec City during the 1780s and 1790s" 3. Arlene Palmer Schwind, "Frederick Rhinelander and the China Market in New York City during the 1770s" 4. Regina L. Blaszczyk, "John Glassford and Company and the China Market in Southern Maryland during the 1770s and 1790s" 5. Barbara Gorely Teller, "Horace Collamore and the China Market in Boston from 1812 to 1824" 6. George L. Miller, "George M. Coates and the China Market in Philadelphia from 1824 to 1830" 7. Susan Myers, "Perine Pottery Works of Baltimore, 1838-1843: An American Potter's Perspective on Marketing Pottery" The papers were tightly focussed on merchandising, pottery prices, and terminology used by the merchants. One hundred and seventy-eight delegates attended the conference, a cross-section of archaeologists, museum curators, and collectors. Anyone desiring further information on the conference or anyone who knows of merchants' records for pottery and/or glass in Canada is invited to write to: George L. Miller Material Culture Research Parks Canada 1600 Liverpool Court Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1G2 121 LIVERPOOL EXHIBITION AND SEMINAR A special seminar will be held at Morley College, London, England,on 8 and 9 November 1980, together with the largest collection of wares from the Liverpool region ever put on exhibition in London. Exhibits have been drawn from the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Merseyside County Museum, Liverpool, the Williamson Museum, Birkenhead, and a number of the smaller provincial museums, as well as from private collections. To coincide with the exhibition, the Morley College Ceramic Circle will be holding its eleventh annual seminar. This will be devoted to the history of the wares of the region when this locality was one of the most important ceramic centres in the whole of England. All enquiries should be sent to the Secretary, Morley College Ceramic Circle, 61 Westminister Bridge Road, London SE1 7HT, England. EARLY ONTARIO CLOTHING Dianne Reid (404 Laurier Ave. E., Ottawa, Ont.) is pursuing research at the Public Archives of Canada, Archives of Ontario, and Baldwin Room, Toronto Public Library, on the clothing worn by the men and women in the Newark/York governing circle from the 1790s to the 1820s. This will include specific information about the Powells, Jarvises, Whites, and other families. An article in preparation will examine the way in which this group procured its clothing, an aspect of early Ontario consumerism. 122 CORRECTION: REVIEW OF AN INTRODUCTION TO CANADIAN ARCHAEOLOGY The second sentence in this review (Material History Bulletin 9: 45-47) should read, "It is a primer of sorts, a Canadian layman's manual on certain aspects of belowground historical archaeology similar in scope to Ivor Noël Hume's 1969 classic, Historical Archaeology." The editors apologize to the reviewer, Dianne Newell, for the typographical mistake which appeared in the published version.